Educating a new creative class
Nike
Aug 16

Nike

Nike
A group of students taking part in a project in association with Nike

“We loved working with the IF. We’ve been overwhelmed by the number of volunteers wanting to come into the schools.”
Nike Ambassador.

What IF we could ask Nike to ‘Just do it?’

We knew our students would jump at the chance to work on a real Nike project. (Who wouldn’t?) But first, we had to encourage Nike to work with us.

It was time for a team talk

Robin and Heather (our Founder and MD) went to Nike’s UK HQ to tell teams about our work, and the huge difference big brands can make to it.
Then we challenged Nike to challenge our students…and boy did they manage that.

In the space of a year they set loads of inner city schools one-day mini briefs. Each one focused on a different department, including football, basketball and trainers. And, because sometimes getting out of the office is the best way to have ideas, Nike gave the students plenty of chances to get sporty. One group even had a basketball session led by the London School of Basketball.

We’re gearing up for even bigger projects

Those one-day projects were great, but they really flew by. This year, Nike’s going bigger: developing two-day and five-day creative experiences in Hackney to pick our students’ brains, hear their ideas and get closer to the local community.

Basketball isn’t the only way to beat creative blocks

Nike volunteers got our students playing sport to help them find new ideas. If you don’t have a basketball team handy, here are a few other tricks you can try:

  1. Go for a walk
    Just getting some fresh air could help you look at your creative problem in a new way. And sometimes it’s when you walk away from a problem completely that an answer will pop into your head.
  2. Talk to someone else
    Chatting through a problem will help you see it more clearly. And who knows, the other person might even have a clever way to solve it.
  3. Pretend to be someone else
    It’s not as strange as it sounds. Asking yourself how a superhero, celebrity or even a pet might approach the brief could shift your thinking out of that rut.